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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
and cairo. issues leading the east asia summit that president obama is an app. the death toll in the gaza strip surpassed 100 on monday. with evidence that an egyptian a truce is in the side. ben rose, the deputy national security adviser for strategic administration at the white house says clinton and obama have been talking about this threat to the trip. -- throughout the trip. they discussed the way forward. they concluded the best way to the dance discussions with leaders is for secretary clinton to take this trip beginning with our close partner, israel. and clinton's middle east talks do not include hamas leaders. they say the secretary will not meet with hamas, that states does not recognize diplomatically. clinton cut short her stay at the east asia summit to take this trip. headline in the "baltimore sun" -- middle east conflict puts the united states in a bind. israel risks other goals across the region. by all accounts, the damage to united states influence in the area is likely to grow if israel sends ground troops into gauze and, as it is threaded to do to stop hamas from fir
, but it's in many of the papers this morning, angry protesters filling tahrir square in cairo. they're stepping up pressure for their president to rescind a decree that they say threaten the nation with a new era of autocracy. there's the picture on the front page of the washington times. we will be talking about this on sunday on the washington journal. back to the phone calls. john in san jose, california, independent. caller: thanks so much for having me. good morning. i have a really good friend who's a teacher at a high school we attended when we were in high school. one of the things she complains about the most is just how rigid the system is. really, i think it's ironic that we continue to say teachers are important, although teachers for the most part are not in charge of their own profession. the system should be a little bit more organic in the sense that if a teacher has a great idea she can rally real talent her or him. the other of thing i wanted to share is there's a whole system within the system that provides individualized education plans to students who have speci
is taking pictures of some of zandt in cairo. -- some event in cairo. you knew it was and of effective look. -- an objective look. i do not know who is taking the pictures. they may be working for some small network because the network does not want to bring in its own cameraman. >> notice if you watch more than one newscast, notice the number of times you will see precisely the same video when it comes from overseas in large part because the networks do not have their own reporters, and they have brought it from the same source. . no. 2, what is wrong with having a local reporter covering the event? a local reporter speaks the language and knows the people. let's say the local reporter is reported from tehran and the local reporter knows if he or she makes a misstep, they are going to be arrested and thrown in jail. the american reporter may get thrown out of the country, but that is probably the worst that is going to happen. i find there is no willingness to believe objectivity in journalism is possible. i keep hearing there is no such thing as absolute objectivity, to which i say, when
on the mississippi river are going to be so shallow between st. louis, missouri, and cairo, illinois, and then on top of that because of rock tentacles between red tower and theebs, illinois, that river traffic may come to a halt on the mississippi river. and that means there's going to be millions of tons of commodities that are not going to be able to be transported north and south on that river. and of course that affects not only the recipients of those commodities, and the shippers of those commodities, but in directly -- indirectly people who mine, make, manufacture, supply those commodities. and so this potentially can have a dramatic impact and negative way on the economy of our country at a time when we are trying to stimulate the economy, create more jobs, and make sure that we do not throw ourselves back into a recession. now, in november, early november, and even toward the end of october, over 15 united states senators, around 65 members of the house of representatives, five or six governors of various states have written letters to president barack obama, major philip may, regional admi
obama has tried to do and in his famous speech in cairo is that he wants to deal with these countries and talk to the electorate. now we have an entirely different landscape, but in egypt, libya, and tunisia. relationship with these countries, these are countries with democratic governments. some of them have chosen paths that are a little more moderate, some leaning a little bit more to the fundamentalist side, but they're still fundamentally democratic and that will be a big challenge for the obama administration. host: its next for egypt? -- what is next for egypt? ?uest: in terms of ta host: the obama administration. guest: they still need to establish some of the legitimate government there. after the incredibly uplifting movements in it to rear square, it has devolved into a long protracted -- tahrir square, it has devloved. there is still no clear internal structure. it is enforcing the new governing structure and egypt has not really begun to speak out. this is a populous and important nation. there really have not since, since mubarak left office. the administration is workin
coordinator to remain in cairo to support the efforts to achieve a sustainable cease- fire. finally, mr. president, let me conclude, as i have in all my discussions with intensity, that in these testing times, we must not lose sight that peace must remain our priority. a two-state solution ending the occupation, and ending the conflict between israel and the palestinians is more urgent than ever. achieving this vision, which has been expressed by this council, has been long overdue and necessary for the stability of the region. comprehensive peace can lead -- can bring lasting security. i am leaving shortly. i wish you a happy thanksgiving. thank you, mr. president. >> i thank the secretary general for his briefing. there are no more
in cairo and stated that he would go, "2-d and-- to the ends of the world to have peace with isreal." he said this about the resolution that you have vowed to vote on. he said he was prepared to live in peace with a palestinian state, but for peace to endure, security must be protected. they must be prepared to and the conflict with israel once and for all. none of these a vital interests appear in the resolution that would be put forward b before te general assembly today. this is why israel cannot accept it. the only way to achieve peace is to reach agreement and not through the un resolutions that completely ignore israel's vital security and national interests. this resolution is one-sided. it pushes things backward. as for the rise of the jewish people, i have a simple message for those people gathered in the general assembly today -- no decision by the un can break the 4000-year-old bond between the people of israel and the land of israel. [applause] mr. president, the people of israel wait for a palestinian leader in that that is willing to follow in the path -- the world waits fo
that the attack began spontaneously following protests earlier that day at our embassy at cairo. we provided. the wee is the intelligence director. we use that information to discuss it intelligently. we continue to emphasize that the information gathered was preliminary and evil thing." end quote. i then asked ambassador patrick kennedy of the state department, who testified at the hearing, whether he had any reason to doubt that ambassador rice had relied on the information from the national intelligence director. he replied, "know, and misses morton. when i came up to give a briefing earlier this week, both of us were relying on the same information. if i or any other senior administration official, career or non-career, would have been on that television show other than susan rice, we would have said the same thing because we were drawing on the same intelligence information that was then available to us. this has been, as you all know, an evolving situation. what we knew that first week and that first weekend had evolved over time. we know much more now than we knew then. we have no rep
in cairo as we speak. we have been deeply involved in helping to stand them up, and we are going to carefully consider what more we can do. i will be having much more to say about that as we move toward the friends of the syrian people meeting in morocco in the second week of december. no other decisions have been made yet, but we consider them on an almost daily basis. at the united states has provided more than $200 million in humanitarian assistance -- syrian people who weapon displaced are facing difficult conditions given the winter that is upon them. this remains a very difficult situation to manage because there are so many interests by all of the players, many of which are contradictory. turkey, for example, is very much at the leadership level, committed to seeing the end of the syrian regime, but incredibly worried that not enough will be done that empowers the kurds, particularly the pkk affiliates. jordan is working hard to maintain stability inside its own country. they are obviously worried about upsetting the delicate demographic balance inside. lebanon has tried v
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)